Best Smart Electronic Door Locks of 2021

Our top electronic locks (starting with Schlage Encode) offer keyless entry and other smart ways to unlock your door.
Best for security
Schlage Encode
Schlage Encode
  • Icon Pros  Light
    Built-in alarm
  • Icon Pros  Light
    High security rating
Best smart features
Best keyless touchscreen
Yale Assure Lock SL
Yale Assure Lock SL
  • Icon Pros  Light
    Up to 250 codes
  • Icon Pros  Light
    Easy installation

The Schlage Encode sits atop our rankings because it has more robust security than the competition. It complements smart home systems nicely, but you can also program pin codes on the keypad without a mobile app or smart hub.

We compared prices, security ratings, customer reviews, and ease of use to pick the most secure electronic locks for your front or back door.


Compare the best electronic locks

Best for security Best smart features

Best keyless touchscreen Budget Bluetooth pick
Schlage Encode August Wi-Fi Smart Lock Yale Assure Lock SL Kwikset Aura
List price*

$249.00

$249.99

$299.99

$113.97

Physical key option
Icon Yes  Light

Yes

Icon Yes  Light

Yes

Icon No  Light

No

Icon Yes  Light

Yes

Keypad
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Yes

Icon Yes  Light

Optional accessory

Icon Yes  Light

Yes

Icon Yes  Light

Yes

Open with app
Icon Yes  Light

Yes

Icon Yes  Light

Yes

Icon Yes  Light

Yes

Icon Yes  Light

Yes

Compatible with Alexa
Icon Yes  Light

Yes

Icon Yes  Light

Yes

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Yes

Icon No  Light

No

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*Amazon.com list price as of 2/28/2021 at 3:00 p.m. (MT). Read full disclaimer.

Best keyless electronic locks reviews

1. Schlage Encode: Best for security

Best for security

For top-notch protection, you can’t beat the Schlage Encode. This smart lock is one of the most expensive on our list (averaging around $250), but it delivers on both convenience and security.

This keyless lock comes with the highest security rating of any door lock we considered. The Schlage Encode boasts ANSI/BHMA Grade 1 certification, which is the highest rating available.

Pro Heading
Pros
Pro Bullet Built-in alarm
Pro Bullet Backup key
Pro Bullet Strong construction
Pro Bullet Voice control with Alexa
Pro Bullet Easy installation
Con Heading
Cons
Con Bullet Slow customer service
Con Bullet High price tag
Con Bullet Poor battery life

We especially like that you don't have to connect this lock to a?smart home hub thanks to its built-in Wi-Fi. This is a big improvement over the Schlage Connect, our previous top pick, which worked only with Z-Wave (or Zigbee) smart homes.

Still, Wi-Fi uses a lot of juice, so don't expect more than a couple months' worth of battery life on this Wi-Fi smart lock.

2. August Wi-Fi Smart Lock: Best smart features

The?August Wi-Fi Smart Lock is a pioneer when it comes to smart locks—especially for renters and anyone who doesn't want to go through the hassle of brand-new lock installation.?

Enjoy remote control, low battery alerts, and a secure built-in Wi-Fi connection. There's also a Bluetooth connection for better battery performance when you're at home.

Pro Heading
Pros
Pro Bullet Sleek design
Pro Bullet Auto-lock/unlock feature
Pro Bullet Home automation compatibility
Pro Bullet Easy installation
Pro Bullet Simple mobile app
Con Heading
Cons
Con Bullet No security ratings
Con Bullet Pricey
Con Bullet Short battery life
Con Bullet Keypad costs extra

And when it comes to looks, this lock stands out. Because it installs on the inside of your door, you’ll appreciate the compact, unobtrusive modern design that complements most home décor.

We really like that it has a smaller size that isn't as bulky on your door. It's a bit more expensive than the previous versions, costing around $250.

The August Wi-Fi Smart Lock works with existing deadbolts, which is convenient. However, it isn’t compatible with all deadbolt models, so make sure yours is compatible before making the investment.

Learn more about this company's locks in our full?August smart lock review.

3. Yale Assure Lock SL: Best keyless touchscreen

Best keyless touchscreen

The Yale Assure Lock SL?has a slick keyless touchscreen that makes it a stylish addition to your front door. While we prefer the Wi-Fi version that uses the August Home app, there are also Z-Wave, Zigbee, and HomeKit variants so you can connect this lock to your smart home platform of choice.

It features an easy-to-use touchscreen keypad that is backlit. You can program and save up to 250 entry codes—more codes than any other smart deadbolt on our list.

Pro Heading
Pros
Pro Bullet Up to 250 unique codes
Pro Bullet Easy installation
Pro Bullet Voice control with Alexa or Google
Con Heading
Cons
Con Bullet Pricey

This keypad door lock also comes with a privacy setting that lets you disable some or all codes for a specified amount of time. This feature could come in handy for a few reasons, but our favorite scenario is locking out teens who try to sneak in (or out) after curfew.

Although the backlit touchscreen is attractive, users express concern about wear and leftover fingerprints that could tip off a thief.

Read our Yale smart lock review?to learn more about the Yale Assure Lock SL.

Thumbs Up
Nest x Yale

The Nest x Yale is generally more affordable than the Wi-Fi version of the Yale Assure SL. It's a perfect choice for Google-centered smart homes, but isn't compatible with Amazon Alexa or Apple HomeKit.

4. Kwikset Aura: Budget Bluetooth pick

Budget Bluetooth pick

Kwikset is one of the most well-known names in home locks, and the Kwikset Aura Bluetooth lock combines the look of their conventional keypad locks with high-tech functionality.

Aura uses Bluetooth to connect to your smartphone so you can lock and unlock your door with the app. Unlocking isn't as seamless as it was on the Kwikset Kevo, which only required a tap on the lock itself, but it's still convenient for most folks.

Pro Heading
Pros
Pro Bullet Bluetooth
Pro Bullet One-touch locking
Pro Bullet Keypad and traditional key options
Pro Bullet Affordable
Con Heading
Cons
Con Bullet Lower customer satisfaction
Con Bullet Glitchy app
Con Bullet No remote access

This Bluetooth lock doesn't connect to the internet, so you can control it only when you're close to the lock. It's disappointing that there's no remote access, but it practically cuts the price in half compared to Wi-Fi smart locks.

Despite the trusted brand name, the Aura isn’t a customer favorite, though it fares better than other Kwikset smart locks. This smart deadbolt has a number of customer reviews complaining about the quality of the lock. Reliability, slow response time, and glitches with the app are among the top concerns.

Notepad
Kwikset Halo

The Kwikset Halo is essentially a Wi-Fi version of the Aura, though it is more expensive and has a shorter battery life on average.

More brands we considered

SimpliSafe

The SimpliSafe Smart Lock is a newcomer to the smart lock scene that gives you a keyless lock option for the SimpliSafe ecosystem. Unfortunately, it requires a SimpliSafe monitoring subscription, so it's not useful to folks without a SimpliSafe system.

For a deeper look at this lock, read our SimpliSafe Smart Lock review or check out our video review on YouTube.

SoHoMiLL

The SoHoMiLL Electronic Door Knob?is affordable (under $50) and works with both left- and right-hinged doors. But we wish it could hold more codes—you can only store up to eight, compared to hundreds on other electronic lock models. And this isn’t a deadbolt, so it adds more convenience than extra security.

How to fake a smart lock

If you're not ready for a full new smart lock system right now, consider supplementing your regular lock with smart lock accessories. These products grant you strong security and modern convenience without fully replacing your current lock.

Sesame Smart Lock

Haven Connect Smart Lock

ProsTurns a regular lock into a smart lock

Installs easily

Military-grade encryption
Supplements deadbolt security

Hands-free entry

Notifies you of tampering or attempted break-in
ConsDoesn’t function as a lock on its own

High price tag
Requires additional purchases for full functionality
Where to find it

Final word

The Schlage Encode?offers a rigid construction that stands up to abuse and earns it a Grade 1 security rating. It even works directly with your smartphone thanks to built-in Wi-Fi, though it doesn't have the best battery life.

Overall, door locks and deadbolts offer varying levels of security and convenience. And they're the first line of defense for your home and family, so they need to be reliable. Stick with us a little longer by checking out our list of frequently asked questions about smart locks.

Our approach

Using your fingerprint to unlock the front door may seem like sci-fi, but the future is here! We pushed through all the high-tech razzle-dazzle to find the best smart and electronic keyless door locks for your home.

To find the best electronic locks, we reviewed twenty locks for overall security, functionality, reliability, and customer satisfaction. We considered national standards for lock security as well as expert ratings and customer reviews.

More than twenty hours of independent research went into comparing and contrasting the benefits and downsides of each lock to determine our top picks.

  • 30 hours researched
  • 28 products considered
  • 2,500+ customer reviews consulted
  • 368 ounces of coffee consumed

Learn more about how we review products by reading our methodology.

Smart Lock FAQ

An electronic door lock can be the first step toward a fully automated?smart home. People who are skeptical or intimidated by home automation often find a smart lock easier to understand, making them more likely to give it a try.

After?experiencing the benefits?of a keyless lock, they just can’t wait to make something else smart. Maybe something as simple as a crock pot or more advanced like smart lighting or a smart thermostat.

Before you know it, they’re seeking out smart home hubs like Amazon Alexa or Google Home to control all their smart devices with the sound of their voice.?If you find yourself sliding down the slippery slope of smart home automation, do it the right way by checking out some of our?related articles.

Subscribe to our?Youtube?channel?for more videos like this one! Learn how to protect your home, your loved ones, yourself and your belongings.

The?ANSI/BHMA?(American National Standards Institute/Builders Hardware Manufacturers Association) grading system is the most common rating used to provide consumers with quality assurance when it comes to the smart door lock you use to protect your home.

These organizations put consumer locks through a series of tests to determine operational function, pull strength, key torque cycles, and impact resistance. Look for locks with an ANSI/BHMA Grade 1 or Grade 2 for the best security.?These industry standards ensure your locks work now and for years to come.

Light Bulb
ANSI/BHMA letter ratings

Depending on the lock, you might see a?letter rating?instead—like AAA. The three letters cover three categories respectively: durability, strength/security, and finish. Grade A is the highest rating in a given category and Grade C is the lowest.

When it comes to how your smart deadbolt works, there is a lot of tech lingo floating around. Here’s a quick reference to demystify the jargon:

  • Bluetooth:?Bluetooth locks use your smartphone’s Bluetooth to connect to a mobile app. This type of smart door lock has a short range, requiring an adapter to connect to your Wi-Fi network.
  • Wi-Fi:?Wi-Fi locks connect directly to the internet, but aren’t as common as Bluetooth, Z-Wave, and Zigbee because they drain batteries faster. It’s typically the priciest type of smart lock.
  • Z-Wave or Zigbee:?These smart home devices use mesh networks where all the devices that talk to each other. Both Z-Wave and Zigbee require a smart hub to communicate with mobile apps.
  • Radio frequency identification (RFID) or near-field communication (NFC):?RFID locks use a key fob or card for entry. Radio waves from the key card communicate with the lock to allow entry. This is the same tech behind most mobile payment platforms like Apple Pay and Google Pay.

Both convenience and security play big roles in an effective smart lock, so it’s wise to choose a smart lock with equal helpings of each. But it’s also okay if you prefer one over the other:

  • Convenience:?Remote access, no more spare keys, and hands-free entry are all big perks of smart locks. When you’re coming in with an armload of groceries or letting in the dog walker from somewhere else, you can’t beat a smart door lock. In essence, smart locks are about convenience.
  • Security:?While smart locks aren’t stronger than traditional locks, they do control who has access to your home and when. Locks that allow you to create a virtual key or pin code for users (and disable it as needed) give you much more security than traditional keys.

Yes, but the biggest difference is that a smart door lock is vulnerable to remote hacks, so a burglar no longer has to be on-site to bypass your lock. But most hackers aren’t interested in breaking into homes when they can target bigger fish for similar effort.

Considering the downfalls of a traditional lock (losing keys, lock picking), the risks aren’t any greater—and they may actually be less likely to occur.

Smart locks don’t use a standard key tumbler, so they look different from other door locks. Some believe the sleek, modern look of smart locks signals to a burglar that you like to spend money on fancy gadgets.

But this is speculation and there’s no evidence to support that fear. If this concerns you, seek out a smart lock that looks more like a traditional deadbolt.

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*Amazon.com list price as of 2/28/2021 at 3:00 p.m. (MT). Product prices and availability are accurate as of this date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any prices and availability information displayed on Amazon at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. Safewise.com utilizes paid Amazon links.

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Rebecca Edwards
Written by
Rebecca Edwards
Rebecca is the lead safety reporter and in-house expert for SafeWise.com. She has been a journalist and blogger for over 25 years, with a focus on home and community safety for the past six. Rebecca spends dozens of hours every month testing and evaluating security products and strategies. Her safety expertise is sought after by publications, broadcast journalists, non-profit organizations, podcasts, and more. You can find her work and contributions in places like TechCrunch, The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, HGTV, MSN, and an ever-growing library of radio and TV clips.